Home > Allies and Networks > AIMES (African Initiative on Mining, Environment and Society) > Ada Songor Lagoon under threat and requires a dimensional conversation around the salt industry in Ghana. Dr Graham

The Ada Songor lagoon is under serious threat following activities of some businessmen who are wreaking havoc on the salt winning site.The level of devastation at the site could have dire consequences on the environment.

The havoc                                                                                                                                          From afar, this is what is left of the Ada Songor Lagoon – Dry, parched and degraded.The once vibrant salt mining field has been deserted leaving just a few but privileged residents in the winning business.According to some residents, activities of some private winners is wreaking havoc on the lagoon.Instead of waiting for the rains, Private businessmen have demarcated portions of the lagoon for salt winning.

A development they said has also affected fishing activities in the lagoon.

“This is not how the lagoon was, during the rains, we come fishing in the lagoon and when the fishing season is over, then we start the winning of salt. it was a level field and all we the locals needed to do was enter the lagoon and start winning. this is no longer the case. look at the level of devastation”? Madam Jane Ocansey, a local salt winner told JoyBusiness.

With the help of pumping machines, water is pumped into demarcated dykes popularly known as “Atsiakpo” for production.

This development has virtually driven many local salt winners out of business.Local residents who can’t afford the cost of dredging a dyke now work as labourers for dyke owners.Mining the crystallized salt and carrying out of the dykes cost 1 cedi per bowl.Sometimes, they are paid GH₵20 cedis as “by day workers” on a dyke.

Local residents who can’t afford the cost of dredging a dyke now work as labourers for dyke owners.

Mining the crystallized salt and carrying out of the dykes cost 1 cedi per bowl.

Sometimes, they are paid GH₵20 cedis as “by day workers” on a dyke.